Running the Race (of Life)

What’s the difference between a 100m dash and a marathon? Nothing.

You have to train for both. One requires speed and one requires endurance.

If you cannot get out of the blocks fast and hit your stride within a few seconds,

all is lost if you are a sprinter.

Likewise, if you cannot pace yourself, you will never complete a marathon.

Both are a race.

Both require a specific skill set.

Both can be won or lost.

Both require you run as an individual but still contribute to the team’s success.

Some runners like to race quickly and get it over and others take a slower methodical

approach.   Then, why are some held in higher esteem than others?

Maybe they aren’t but I think they are.

 

What’s the difference between offense and defense? Nothing.

You really cannot win a game without either doing their job.

If no goals are let in by the defense – that’s great.

But, unless the offense scores, there won’t be a win.

If the offense scores but lets but the defense lets balls get past and into the net, 

there still might not be a win. 

 

We all run the race. Someone makes the coffee, others drink it.

Someone develops a plan, others carry it out.

Authors write a book, library patrons read it.

Dreamers dream, poets write.

Painters paint, museum visitors admire.

 

So, when we focus on one job, we often benignly neglect others.

A well-oiled piece of machinery works without squeaks. This is teamwork.

Teamwork is when all the parts work together, trusting each other to do what’s

needed to get the job done, and the race is run together with both sprinters and long-

distance runners doing their job. It’s the only way the race can be won.

 

 

 

 

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